Organic Chickpeas

Organic Chickpeas

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Description

Enjoy the taste of this rich and hearty Lentil, while maintaining your complete diet system.

Number8 Organic Chickpeas are seeds from legume plants that split in half after hulling. They cook relatively quickly and provide an important protein source. A 1-cup serving of red Lentils contains 230 calories, but they are highly nutritious. Red lentils provide nutrients that improve your health and help you lose weight and maintain weight loss.

In addition, Number8 Organic Chickpeas have high amounts of fiber and folate in them, which is what gives this food anti-cancer properties.

PRODUCT: Organic Chickpeas
QUANTITY: 500 g
BRAND: Number8
SHELF LIFE: 36 Months
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: Peru
ORGANIC: Yes
VEGAN: Yes
VEGETARIAN: Yes

INGREDIENTS: Organic Chickpeas

Chickpea or chick pea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its different types are variously known as gram or Bengal gram, garbanzo or garbanzo bean, and Egyptian pea. Chickpea seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes and 7500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

Chickpea is a key ingredient in hummus, chana masala, and can be ground into flour and made into falafel. It is also used in salads and soups. The chickpea is important in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine and in 2016, India produced 64% of the world’s total chickpeas.

Domesticated Chickpeas have been found in the aceramic levels of Jericho (PPNB) along with Çayönü in Turkey and in Neolithic pottery at Hacilar, Turkey. They were found in the late Neolithic (about 3500 BC) at Thessaly, Kastanas, Lerna and Dimini, Greece. In southern France, Mesolithic layers in a cave at L’Abeurador, Aude, have yielded wild chickpeas carbon dated to 6790±90 BC.

Chickpeas are mentioned in Charlemagne’s Capitulare de villis (about 800 AD) as cicer italicum, as grown in each imperial demesne. Albertus Magnus mentions red, white, and black varieties. Nicholas Culpeper noted “chick-pease or cicers” are less “windy” than peas and more nourishing. Ancient people also associated chickpeas with Venus because they were said to offer medical uses such as increasing sperm and milk, provoking menstruation and urine, and helping to treat kidney stones. “White cicers” were thought to be especially strong and helpful.

In 1793, ground-roast Chickpeas were noted by a German writer as a substitute for coffee in Europe. In the First World War, they were grown for this use in some areas of Germany. They are still sometimes brewed instead of coffee.

Sequencing of the Chickpea genome has been completed for 90 chickpea genotypes, including several wild species. A collaboration of 20 research organizations, led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), sequenced CDC Frontier, a kabuli chickpea variety, and identified more than 28,000 genes and several million genetic markers.

Originally cultivated in the Mediterranean and the Middle East, chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, have spread their culinary influence across the world. They also come with a range of potential health benefits. Though the most common type of chickpea appears round and beige, other varieties can be black, green, and red.

Like other legumes, such as beans, peas, and lentils, chickpeas are high in fiber and protein, and contain several key vitamins and minerals.

Chickpeas have been associated with a number of possible health benefits, some of which are as follows:

1) Diabetes:
Chickpeas are particularly high in fiber. Studies have shown that people with type 1 diabetes who consume high-fiber diets have lower blood glucose levels.
For people with type 2 diabetes, higher fiber intake may improve blood sugar, lipid, and insulin levels.
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends a minimum of 21 to 25 grams (g) of fiber per day for women and 30 to 38 g per day for men.

2) Bone Health:
The iron, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and vitamin K in chickpeas all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength.
Though phosphate and calcium are both important in bone structure, the careful balance of the two minerals is necessary for proper bone mineralization – consumption of too much phosphorus with too little calcium intake can result in bone loss.
Bone matrix formation requires the mineral manganese, and iron and zinc play crucial roles in the production and maturation of collagen.

Adequate vitamin K consumption is important for good bone health because it improves calcium absorption and may reduce urinary excretion of calcium, making sure that enough calcium is available for building and repairing bone. Low intake of vitamin K is associated with a higher risk for bone fracture.

3) Blood Pressure:
Maintaining a low-sodium (low-salt) intake is essential for maintaining a low blood pressure, however increasing potassium intake may be just as important because of its vasodilation effects. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, fewer than 2 percent of United States adults meet the daily 4,700-milligram recommendation.

4) Heart Health:
The high fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B-6 content all support heart health. Chickpeas contain significant amounts of fiber, which helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in the blood, thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease.
In one study, those who consumed 4,069 milligrams of potassium per day had a 49 percent lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease compared with those who consumed less potassium (about 1,000 mg per day).

5) Cancer:
Although the mineral selenium is not present in most fruits and vegetables, it can be found in chickpeas. It helps the enzymes of the liver to function properly and detoxify some cancer-causing compounds in the body. Additionally, selenium prevents inflammation and decreases tumor growth rates.
Chickpeas also contain folate, which plays a role in DNA synthesis and repair, and so helps prevent the formation of cancer cells from mutations in the DNA. Saponins, phytochemicals present in chickpeas, prevent cancer cells from multiplying and spreading throughout the body.
High-fiber intakes from chickpeas and other legumes, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables are associated with a lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
Vitamin C functions as a powerful antioxidant and helps protect cells against free radical damage.

6) Cholesterol:
Research shows that including chickpeas in the diet lowers the amount of low-density lipoprotein, or bad cholesterol, in the blood.

7) Inflammation:
The choline in chickpeas helps with sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory. Choline also helps to maintain the structure of cellular membranes, aids in the transmission of nerve impulses, assists in the absorption of fat and reduces chronic inflammation.

8) Digestion and Regularity:
Because of their high fiber content, chickpeas help to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthful digestive tract.

9) Weight Management and Satiety:
Dietary fibers function as “bulking agents” in the digestive system. These compounds increase satiety (a feeling of fullness) and reduce appetite, making people feel fuller for longer and thereby lowering overall calorie intake.
Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions. Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant foods like chickpeas decreases the risk of obesity, overall mortality, diabetes, heart disease, promotes a healthful complexion, healthful hair, increased energy, and overall lower weight.

10) Irritable Bowel Syndrome:
Although chickpeas do not ease the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, they can be helpful to people affected by the condition.
Patsy Catsos, a registered dietitian and author of “IBS – Free at Last!” suggests that increasing fiber consumption in individuals who have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be a challenge. However, chickpeas offer a source of fiber that is well-tolerated by some IBS patients.

Unfortunately, people with IBS who are following a low-FODMAP diet do have to restrict chickpeas.

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